14 THINGS I WISH I KNEW BEFORE MOVING TO BERLIN

Berlin has become, without a doubt, one of the most popular cities for expats to call home. Many come for the cheap living, excellent arts, and wild nightlife, all of which the city offers in spades. Others, naturally, for the schnitzel. What most aren’t ready for, though, are the inevitable obstacles they face upon arriving, a lot of which are universal when moving to any new country, but many of which are so. Damn. German.

I moved to Berlin a few years ago with an excellent network of expat friends to guide me through the transition, but there were still plenty of peculiarities I had to learn along the way. To help the next wave of folks eager to try out the German capital, here is a list of things I wish someone had told me about

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What makes Berlin so attractive for young people?

by Lisa Krueger-Franke
Slider, Travel

Whenever I tell people I am from Germany, I get this one reaction: “Oh really? I went to Berlin once, I loved it!” And ever so often, I meet people, who tell me their dream is to live in Berlin for a while. I have to admit, I am not mad about Berlin (living there I mean, I love visiting it), for me it’s just a bit too hipster and a bit too big but I obviously still wonder what does make Berlin so attractive to people all over the world and also all around Germany? I was thinking about what I like when I come visit and I was also talking to some people who actually moved to Berlin for a while. And here are some of the reasons I figured out.

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Investment in Berlin startups jumped by €1 billion this year, study shows

Venture capital investments in German startups hit a record level in the first half of 2017, with Berlin seeing a huge rise in funding for its startup scene, a new report shows.
Funding rounds for startups in Germany and the overall value of funding hit record levels in the first six months of this year, a report released this month by professional services firm EY reveals.

The total number of investments in German startups rose by 6 percent in comparison with the same period in 2016, to 264.

But the really explosive growth was seen in the overall size of investment. In the first half of this year, €2.163 billion of investors’ money went into startups, an increase of roughly €1.2 billion in comparison with the first half of 2016.

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EasyJet announces Berlin expansion and more flights

Airline in talks with other carriers to allow booking of more connecting flight.

EasyJet Europe, the sister airline set up to preserve easyJet after Brexit, has accelerated its growth by announcing rapid expansion in Berlin and new long-haul connections at Paris and Amsterdam.

The easyJet chief executive, Johan Lundgren, said: “There’s no doubt that the growth potential is in Europe. The UK will always be a critical market, but we have more to go at in the European mainland.”

EasyJet expects to fly 5.6 million passengers this year from Berlin, making it comfortably the biggest airline in the German capital, ahead of Lufthansa.

Lundgren added: “The German population have paid too much money to go on flights and that’s something we want to change.

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The party city grows up: how Berlin’s clubbers built their own urban village

What if a city allowed a huge regeneration project to be led, not by the wealthiest property developer, but by the club owners who put on the best parties in town? With the opening of Holzmarkt, Berlin is about to find out

For the first decade of the 21st century, the industrial wasteland between Berlin’s Ostbahnhof station and the river Spree was earmarked for a huge urban regeneration project – one that would show that the German capital could keep up with London and New York. Where flowing water had once marked the divide between communist and capitalist spheres of influence were to be a phalanx of high-rise blocks made of shiny glass, some of them 80 metres tall, containing luxury apartments, hotels and offices.

But tomorrow, that same 12,000m2 patch of land will open with an altogether different look: an urban village made of recycled windows, secondhand bricks and scrap wood, containing among other things a studio for circus acrobats, a children’s theatre, a cake shop and a nursery where parents can drop off their children while they go clubbing next door. There’s even a landing stage for beavers.

The Holzmarkt development is the result of an unprecedented experiment in a major world capital: what if a city allowed a new quarter to be built not by the highest bidding property developers or the urban planners with the highest accolades, but the nightclub owners who put on the best parties in town?

. . .

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Entrepreneurs, Academics & Entrepreneurial Academics succeed in Berlin

With Berlin’s plethora of life science research and academia, opportunities abound for biotech entrepreneurs. Here’s how the city bridges the gap between science and business!

So much research, so many opportunities for academics and entrepreneurs. Berlin boasts 35 large research institutions focused on life sciences, and around 130 hospitals — including Europe’s largest and most renowned university hospital, Charité. The research clout of Berlin described through quantity is impressive on its own, and the city has the quality to match.

Two German institutions dominating the Nature Index as some of the most prolific publishers in the magazine count with institutes in Berlin: the Max Planck Society, number four on the list, claims Institutes of Infection Biology and Molecular Genomics, and the Helmholtz Association, number eight, has the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine. In fact, our editor, Evelyn, was inspired by Berlin’s top-notch research to move here from New York City for a PhD in chemistry and chemical biology at the Freie Universität!

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WHAT I LEARNED ABOUT BERLIN AFTER A DAY OF MEETUPS

Berlin is the fourth largest Meetup city in Europe and one of its fastest growing cities globally. Madhvi Ramani spent an entire day Meetup-hopping to gain a unique view into Berlin and its inhabitants.

It’s 8:30 a.m. and I’m riding the U-Bahn. It’s crowded – at least, as crowded as it gets in Berlin. Everyone is able to hang on to a few inches of personal space as well as their dignity. Still, their rush hour demeanours are familiar: harassed, grim, preoccupied with smart phones and tablets.

I feel smug in my yoga pants, because my day promises to be anything but monotonous. I’ve signed up to an entire day of Meetups – events organised via the social networking website that brings people with similar interests together.

Since the site’s 2002 launch in New York, Meetups can be found all over the globe – but for some reason, Berlin is one of its fastest growing cities. Since its first Meetup was mooted in 2008, it has become the fourth largest city in Europe. What does that say about the city? I’m here to find out.

( . . . )

This, the React Native Meetup is the biggest I’ve been to all day, with almost 300 attendees. Tech Meetups are a popular way for developers and designers to network, and are heavily linked to the city’s burgeoning start-up culture, of which Zalando is one of the major successes. Nearly 30 per cent of all Berlin Meetups are now tech-related.

Officially we’re here to listen some presentations about using React Native, an open-source JavaScript library. Most attendees, however, seem more interested in the boxes of free pizza that are up for grabs. I cram slice after slice into my mouth as my neighbour says that the pizza provided by the Meetups of Berlin-based online bank N26 is better. Some people, it seems, are here with a single agenda – and I might be one of them, as I notice the curiosity and openness I started my day with are gone. As the speaker from Soundcloud begins to talk about using the framework for app prototyping, I lose interest and wander off to the loo.

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Germany Is Building a Wall to Protect the Berlin Wall

An effort to limit damage done to the Cold War landmark by tourists.

Souvenier-seeking tourists have done serious damage to the Berlin Wall, leaving Germany with no choice: A wall in front of the wall will be erected in summer 2018, to protect the landmark structure from further vandalism, reports the Art Newspaper.

This isn’t the first time the idea of a protective barrier in front of the Berlin Wall has been raised. In November 2015, authorities of Berlin’s Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg district, home to the “East Side Gallery” section of the wall, which is covered in murals created in 1990, announced plans to erect a permanent protective fence.

The wall, a designated heritage site, was erected in 1961, dividing citizens of West Berlin from the rest of the city and the surrounding East Germany until November 9, 1989. The wall began coming down in June 1990, but parts of the structure were left intact as a monument.

(…)

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Look out, London. Berlin’s startup scene is ready for a Brexit bonanza

Startups that previously looked to London are being wooed by Berlin’s fast-developing scene. But can Germany capitalise on Brexit uncertainty?

At a co-working space on Friedrichstraße, Berlin’s startup economy is getting ready for Brexit. Mindspace’s first location in Germany, opened in April 2016, sits in the heart of Berlin’s Mitte district, flanked by high-end fashion shops and perfumeries. Its walls are adorned with hand-stencilled signs directing people, in English, to the “yummy kitchen” and “awesome offices”. It feels exactly like the startup scene in London – and that’s deliberate. What London stands to lose after Brexit, Berlin hopes to gain.

(…)

“Berlin is starting to be considered as a startup ecosystem, particularly targeting the tech startup scene,” says Nijvenko. The company’s “official language”, she explains, is English. All signs, documents and posts on the community’s private Facebook group are auf Englisch. Its co-working spaces bare an uncanny resemblance to a template Silicon Valley, faux-hipster style – superfluous clocks; plush, well-worn armchairs; Communist-era televisions; and work from local artists adorn almost every remaining inch of space. Around 760 members pay between €250 and €450 per month (£215 and £390) to use the space, with the two additional sites in Berlin upping capacity to more than 2,000 people. Business is booming. “The political incentives right now are targeting the startup ecosystem. Berlin is very affordable, so for startups it’s the best place to be,” says Nijvenko.

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What Is This Mysterious Bedroom Doing In Berlin’s Subway Tunnels?

Employees of Berlin’s public transport company BVG got a creepy surprise last week, when they discovered a fully-furnished bedroom in an unused section of U-Bahn tunnel. The bedroom was tidy and well looked-after, but the BVG claims that it wasn’t lived in.

These photos, sent anonymously to the Berliner Zeitung news site, may be part of an art project, a political statement, or a prank. The room, on the Berlin Metro’s line 9, is furnished with an Ikea bed, a potted plant (recently-watered), an easy chair, and even a TV, wallpaper, and art. The room, says Berliner Zeitung’s Antje Kara, seems to have a 1980s office vibe to it, although it’s more of a Communist-era East German 1980s vibe than the garish, neon-colored 1980s us Westerners experienced.

Employees of Berlin’s public transport company BVG got a creepy surprise last week, when they discovered a fully-furnished bedroom in an unused section of U-Bahn tunnel. The bedroom was tidy and well looked-after, but the BVG claims that it wasn’t lived in.

These photos, sent anonymously to the Berliner Zeitung news site, may be part of an art project, a political statement, or a prank. The room, on the Berlin Metro’s line 9, is furnished with an Ikea bed, a potted plant (recently-watered), an easy chair, and even a TV, wallpaper, and art. The room, says Berliner Zeitung’s Antje Kara, seems to have a 1980s office vibe to it, although it’s more of a Communist-era East German 1980s vibe than the garish, neon-colored 1980s us Westerners experienced.

The buzz around the prank is focusing on who did it, and how, complete with complaints that Berlin’s metro security has failed. The who may remain a mystery, but the how is easy. Taking your Ikea flatpack furniture home on public transport is totally normal in Berlin. Nobody would pay you any attention. And looking at the photos, it seems that the bedroom is in a part of the underground system away from the actual train tunnels, meaning nobody had to jump off a platform and disappear into a tunnel with a heavy CRT TV set.

By secret underground construction standards, this bedroom is small fry. In the summer of 2004, police in Paris discovered a clandestine cinema hidden in the city’s extensive catacombs while running a training exercise. The 3,000-square-foot subterranean complex was “strung with lights, wired for phones, [and] live with pirated electricity.”

The underground bedroom is still pretty creepy, though. Unless you’re one of Berlin’s homeless, trying to survive the Northern European winter. Then it might seem pretty appealing.

Source – http://www.fastcoexist.com/3056801/what-is-this-mysterious-bedroom-doing-in-berlins-subway-tunnels