German House Price on Fire!

Germany’s housing market price rises have been accelerating for several months. In a country where the housing market has historically been extraordinarily stable, this is a significant shift.

The reasons?
Strong economic growth, 1.1 million refugees, high work-related immigration, weak construction supply and low interest rates.

The German housing market was one of the few that avoided a slump in the wake of the 2008-2009 global financial crisis.

German house price changes:

In 2009, the price index fell by 1.9% y-o-y (-2.7% inflation-adjusted).
In 2010, prices bounced back, rising by 3.6% y-o-y (2.2% inflation-adjusted).
In 2011, house prices rose by 4.7% y-o-y (2.7% inflation-adjusted).
In 2012, house prices rose by 4.6% y-o-y (2.5% inflation-adjusted).
In 2013, house prices rose by 3.2% y-o-y (1.8% inflation-adjusted).
In 2014, house prices rose by 3.7% y-o-y (3.5% inflation-adjusted).
In 2015, house prices rose by 5.6% y-o-y (5.3% inflation-adjusted).


Statistics of price rise during the year Q2 2016:

In North-East Germany:

In Berlin apartment prices rose by 7.7% to a median price of €3,036 (US$ 3,301) per square metre (sq. m.). The median price of one- and two-family houses rose by 4.6% y-o-y to €2,104 (US$ 2,287) per sq. m.

Hanover had the strongest y-o-y apartment price hike in Q2 2016, rising by 10.02% to €2,172 (US$ 2,361) per sq. m. However, one- and two-family houses increased by only 1.33% to €1,719 (US$ 1,869) per sq. m.

In Dresden, median apartment prices rose by 1.79% to €1,987 (US$ 2,160) per sq. m., while one- and two-family houses increased by 6.35% to €1,995 (US$ 2,169) per sq. m.

In Hamburg, median apartment prices increased by only 1.41% to €3,480 (US$ 3,783) per sq. m. One- and two-family houses rose by 2.57% to €2,325 (US$ 2,528) per sq. m..

In West Germany:

Dusseldorf had the highest apartment price increase in the region, rising by 7.62% to a median price of €2,261 (US$ 2,458) per sq. m. In contrast, the median price of one- and two-family houses fell by 1.57% to €2,163 (US$ 2,352) per sq. m.

In Cologne, median apartment prices rose by 5.79% to €2,474 (US$ 2,690) per sq. m. One- and two-family houses had a price increase of 1.92% y-o-y to €2,099 (US$ 2,282) per sq. m.

In Dortmund, median apartment prise fell by 3.05% to €1,300 (US$ 1,413) per sq. m. Prices of one- and two-family houses also fell by 1.06% to €1,872 (US$ 2,035) per sq. m.

In South Germany:

Frankfurt had the weakest y-o-y apartment price hike in South Germany, increasing by 3.29% to €2,600 (US$ 2,827) per sq. m. The same is true for its one- and two-family houses, which rose by only 1.44% to €2,219 (US$ 2,413) per sq. m.

Apartments in Munich enjoy the highest y-o-y price hike in the region, increasing by 10.52% to €4,821 (US$ 5,241) per sq. m. One- and two-family houses had a price increase of 5.75% to €3,627 (US$ 3,943) per sq. m.

In Stuttgart, apartment prices rose by 9.07% to a median price of €2,519 (US$ 2,739) per sq. m., while the median price of one- and two-family houses rose by 8.29% to €2,525 (US$ 2,745) per sq. m.

Berlin’s still cheap, but….

Berlin’s rising rents and overstretched supply of living units is a problem that’s not going to go away on its own. While rents in the German capital are still comparatively cheaper to rates one would find in London, Paris or major US cities, Berliners also generally earn less than their counterparts in other world metropolises.
But Berlin is playing catch-up with its global peers –and the current tightness on the rental market is just a symptom of that.
“Since reunification in 1990, and structural problems have existed for a long time, and now the city is transforming into a world-class city,”